Exploratorium

Exploratorium

The Known Universe from AMNH on Vimeo.

The Known Universe by the American Museum of Natural History. This video will take you on a journey to the end of time and space as we know it.

"Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History.” 
Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 
Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 
Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 

Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 

“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium

“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth Asawa

Ruth Asawa
(b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.

The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm.

Photos © Exploratorium

Sun Swarm singing in the wind and glistening into the lens. Installation by Chris Bell, 2013.

Sun Swarm singing in the wind and glistening into the lens. Installation by Chris Bell, 2013.

kqedscience:

We’ve never called a photo of a spider “adorable” before, so this is a first!
This photo of a jumping spider carrying her baby was taken by Jong Atmosfera.

kqedscience:

We’ve never called a photo of a spider “adorable” before, so this is a first!

This photo of a jumping spider carrying her baby was taken by Jong Atmosfera.

Meet the Tinkerer’s Clock: a massive, whimsical, kinetically sculptural clock featuring legions of tiny tinkerers at work. British artist and tinkerer Tim Hunkin discusses the clock’s inspiration and evolution.  

Come chill with Exploratorium staff scientist Julie Yu at Helix in Los Altos. She’ll vaporize your liquid nitrogen naiveté, revealing the secret behind Dippin’ Dots as she creates DIY ice cream courtesy of -196°C. 
Friday Sept. 19, 6- 8PM
Photo by Mark Walker on PopSci.com

Come chill with Exploratorium staff scientist Julie Yu at Helix in Los Altos. She’ll vaporize your liquid nitrogen naiveté, revealing the secret behind Dippin’ Dots as she creates DIY ice cream courtesy of -196°C.

Friday Sept. 19, 6- 8PM

Photo by Mark Walker on PopSci.com

The color of water. 
Photo by instagram photographer @startafire.
Exhibit at the Exploratorium.

The color of water.

Photo by instagram photographer @startafire.

Exhibit at the Exploratorium.

Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."

Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean


The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.

"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Science of Firefighting: Cisterns
Ever notice a brick-lined circle embedded into a street intersection? Keep an eye out and you’ll see them throughout San Francisco. As part of the San Francisco Fire Department’s Auxiliary Water Supply System, these brick circles indicate a cistern full of water.
Science of Firefighting: Cisterns
Ever notice a brick-lined circle embedded into a street intersection? Keep an eye out and you’ll see them throughout San Francisco. As part of the San Francisco Fire Department’s Auxiliary Water Supply System, these brick circles indicate a cistern full of water.

Science of Firefighting: Cisterns

Ever notice a brick-lined circle embedded into a street intersection? Keep an eye out and you’ll see them throughout San Francisco. As part of the San Francisco Fire Department’s Auxiliary Water Supply System, these brick circles indicate a cistern full of water.

lomographicsociety:

Lomography Tag of the Day by bridge 

lomographicsociety:

Lomography Tag of the Day by bridge 

(via moja-moja)

Unveiled: 5 visions for landscape above Crissy Field
The “Observation Post,” includes a “learning landscape” that includes a variety of installations by the Exploratorium science museum.
Photo: Cmg, CMG

Unveiled: 5 visions for landscape above Crissy Field

The “Observation Post,” includes a “learning landscape” that includes a variety of installations by the Exploratorium science museum.

Photo: Cmg, CMG

Full Moon rise with silhouettes from Astronomy Pic of the Day.

Video Credit & Copyright: Mark Gee; Music: Tenderness (Dan Phillipson)

ucresearch:

The mysterious sailing stones at Racetrack Playa
How does a big heavy rock move on its own across the desert?  The reason is partially due to ice. Researchers have investigated this question since the 1940s, but no one has seen the process in action — until now.
Because the stones can sit for a decade or more without moving, the UC San Diego researchers did not originally expect to see motion in person. Instead, they decided to monitor the rocks remotely by installing a high-resolution weather station capable of measuring gusts to one-second intervals and fitting 15 rocks with custom-built, motion-activated GPS units. 
The experiment was set up in winter 2011 with permission of the Park Service. Then — in what they called “the most boring experiment ever” — the team waited for something to happen.
But in December 2013, Norris and co-author and cousin Jim Norris arrived in Death Valley to discover that the playa was covered with a pond of water seven centimeters (three inches) deep. Shortly after, the rocks began moving.
Their observations show that moving the rocks requires a rare combination of events. First, the playa fills with water, which must be deep enough to form floating ice during cold winter nights but shallow enough to expose the rocks. As nighttime temperatures plummet, the pond freezes to form thin sheets of “windowpane” ice, which must be thin enough to move freely but thick enough to maintain strength. On sunny days, the ice begins to melt and break up into large floating panels, which light winds drive across the playa, pushing rocks in front of them and leaving trails in the soft mud below the surface.
Read more about the discovery here →
ucresearch:

The mysterious sailing stones at Racetrack Playa
How does a big heavy rock move on its own across the desert?  The reason is partially due to ice. Researchers have investigated this question since the 1940s, but no one has seen the process in action — until now.
Because the stones can sit for a decade or more without moving, the UC San Diego researchers did not originally expect to see motion in person. Instead, they decided to monitor the rocks remotely by installing a high-resolution weather station capable of measuring gusts to one-second intervals and fitting 15 rocks with custom-built, motion-activated GPS units. 
The experiment was set up in winter 2011 with permission of the Park Service. Then — in what they called “the most boring experiment ever” — the team waited for something to happen.
But in December 2013, Norris and co-author and cousin Jim Norris arrived in Death Valley to discover that the playa was covered with a pond of water seven centimeters (three inches) deep. Shortly after, the rocks began moving.
Their observations show that moving the rocks requires a rare combination of events. First, the playa fills with water, which must be deep enough to form floating ice during cold winter nights but shallow enough to expose the rocks. As nighttime temperatures plummet, the pond freezes to form thin sheets of “windowpane” ice, which must be thin enough to move freely but thick enough to maintain strength. On sunny days, the ice begins to melt and break up into large floating panels, which light winds drive across the playa, pushing rocks in front of them and leaving trails in the soft mud below the surface.
Read more about the discovery here →
ucresearch:

The mysterious sailing stones at Racetrack Playa
How does a big heavy rock move on its own across the desert?  The reason is partially due to ice. Researchers have investigated this question since the 1940s, but no one has seen the process in action — until now.
Because the stones can sit for a decade or more without moving, the UC San Diego researchers did not originally expect to see motion in person. Instead, they decided to monitor the rocks remotely by installing a high-resolution weather station capable of measuring gusts to one-second intervals and fitting 15 rocks with custom-built, motion-activated GPS units. 
The experiment was set up in winter 2011 with permission of the Park Service. Then — in what they called “the most boring experiment ever” — the team waited for something to happen.
But in December 2013, Norris and co-author and cousin Jim Norris arrived in Death Valley to discover that the playa was covered with a pond of water seven centimeters (three inches) deep. Shortly after, the rocks began moving.
Their observations show that moving the rocks requires a rare combination of events. First, the playa fills with water, which must be deep enough to form floating ice during cold winter nights but shallow enough to expose the rocks. As nighttime temperatures plummet, the pond freezes to form thin sheets of “windowpane” ice, which must be thin enough to move freely but thick enough to maintain strength. On sunny days, the ice begins to melt and break up into large floating panels, which light winds drive across the playa, pushing rocks in front of them and leaving trails in the soft mud below the surface.
Read more about the discovery here →

ucresearch:

The mysterious sailing stones at Racetrack Playa


How does a big heavy rock move on its own across the desert?  The reason is partially due to ice. Researchers have investigated this question since the 1940s, but no one has seen the process in action — until now.

Because the stones can sit for a decade or more without moving, the UC San Diego researchers did not originally expect to see motion in person. Instead, they decided to monitor the rocks remotely by installing a high-resolution weather station capable of measuring gusts to one-second intervals and fitting 15 rocks with custom-built, motion-activated GPS units. 

The experiment was set up in winter 2011 with permission of the Park Service. Then — in what they called “the most boring experiment ever” — the team waited for something to happen.

But in December 2013, Norris and co-author and cousin Jim Norris arrived in Death Valley to discover that the playa was covered with a pond of water seven centimeters (three inches) deep. Shortly after, the rocks began moving.

Their observations show that moving the rocks requires a rare combination of events. First, the playa fills with water, which must be deep enough to form floating ice during cold winter nights but shallow enough to expose the rocks. As nighttime temperatures plummet, the pond freezes to form thin sheets of “windowpane” ice, which must be thin enough to move freely but thick enough to maintain strength. On sunny days, the ice begins to melt and break up into large floating panels, which light winds drive across the playa, pushing rocks in front of them and leaving trails in the soft mud below the surface.

Read more about the discovery here 

Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.
Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.

Throwback Thursday! Exploratorium billboards Watch the Wind Work and Piece the World Together are part advertising, part art. 

The former, Watch the Wind is by Exploratorium artist Ned Kahn. It was located at the East Bay Terminal (currently under construction) on Fremont and Howard Street and recorded the fluid motion of the wind in a surface of shimmering, wind-sensitive reflective discs. 

Piece the World Together. At the Exploratorium (also called Jigsaw City) was by Exploratorium artist Tom Humphrey. Located on Mission Street and 8th Street. It created a jigsaw image of downtown San Francisco using large mirrored puzzle pieces. Some pieces were piled randomly making a mosaic of disconnected reflected images, while others combined into a continuous mirror of sky and city.