Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “exploratorium”

Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 

Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 

The Pinscreen! Curious? Visit us at Pier 15 in San Francisco.

Shaking Shapes…

#ThrowBackThursday to the Exploratorium’s 1982 Explainers

We’re hiring High School Explainers for Fall 2014! Applications due Monday 8/25/14.

Apply here: http://explainers.exploratorium.edu/highschool/apply

Soundwave ((6)) Water, San Francisco Innovative Art + Music Biennial

Thursday, August 21, 2014 • 7:00 p.m. at the Exploratorium - Tickets & More Info

In partnership with Exploratorium Cinema Arts, Soundwave immerses visitors in a cinematic, surround-sound event exploring ideas about the ecologies, stories, and properties of our most important natural resource—water.

www.soundwavesf.com

Our Global Studios (the team who helps build exhibits/programs for other science centers, museums & government agencies around the world) is working with the Mid America Science Museum on their renovation. This heavy hunk of coal was donated by Sebastian Mining in Western Arkansas. The teams are collecting geological samples from around the state to show all the different rocks and minerals that live under our feet - limestone, shale, quartz crystals, etc - telling a bit about how they got there, and different ways people use them. 
Our Global Studios (the team who helps build exhibits/programs for other science centers, museums & government agencies around the world) is working with the Mid America Science Museum on their renovation. This heavy hunk of coal was donated by Sebastian Mining in Western Arkansas. The teams are collecting geological samples from around the state to show all the different rocks and minerals that live under our feet - limestone, shale, quartz crystals, etc - telling a bit about how they got there, and different ways people use them. 

Our Global Studios (the team who helps build exhibits/programs for other science centers, museums & government agencies around the world) is working with the Mid America Science Museum on their renovation. This heavy hunk of coal was donated by Sebastian Mining in Western Arkansas. The teams are collecting geological samples from around the state to show all the different rocks and minerals that live under our feet - limestone, shale, quartz crystals, etc - telling a bit about how they got there, and different ways people use them. 

Dahlias, the official flower of San Francisco, are blooming at @GoldenGatePark! Science of Gardening fun facts: the herbaceous perennial plant has been an Aztec epilepsy remedy, a treatment for diabetes and a potato substitute over its many years of cultivation. Learn more here.Photo by Amy Snyder© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Dahlias, the official flower of San Francisco, are blooming at @GoldenGatePark! Science of Gardening fun facts: the herbaceous perennial plant has been an Aztec epilepsy remedy, a treatment for diabetes and a potato substitute over its many years of cultivation. Learn more here.

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.
Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.
Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.
Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.
Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.
Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.

Our video team went up Sutro Tower to film the next episode of Science in the City that will be released on August 13, 2014!

Looming over San Francisco since 1973, Sutro Tower’s antennae transmit and receive radio and television signals to the nine-county SF Bay Area.

Each lightbulb shows the pulse of a past participant.
Pulse Spiral by Rafael Lozano Hemmer is on display for just a few more Thursday nights (6-10pm) before the exhibit closes on 8/14/14. 
Pulse Spiral was created from a heart rate sensor, computer, DMX controller, custom software, digital dimmers, 300 incandescent lightbulbs, 3 miles of cable, and a metal platform.
Photos by Instagram photographers:
1) @velmaismysti 2) @marshallzhang 3) @robertc35 4) @marshive
Each lightbulb shows the pulse of a past participant.
Pulse Spiral by Rafael Lozano Hemmer is on display for just a few more Thursday nights (6-10pm) before the exhibit closes on 8/14/14. 
Pulse Spiral was created from a heart rate sensor, computer, DMX controller, custom software, digital dimmers, 300 incandescent lightbulbs, 3 miles of cable, and a metal platform.
Photos by Instagram photographers:
1) @velmaismysti 2) @marshallzhang 3) @robertc35 4) @marshive
Each lightbulb shows the pulse of a past participant.
Pulse Spiral by Rafael Lozano Hemmer is on display for just a few more Thursday nights (6-10pm) before the exhibit closes on 8/14/14. 
Pulse Spiral was created from a heart rate sensor, computer, DMX controller, custom software, digital dimmers, 300 incandescent lightbulbs, 3 miles of cable, and a metal platform.
Photos by Instagram photographers:
1) @velmaismysti 2) @marshallzhang 3) @robertc35 4) @marshive
Each lightbulb shows the pulse of a past participant.
Pulse Spiral by Rafael Lozano Hemmer is on display for just a few more Thursday nights (6-10pm) before the exhibit closes on 8/14/14. 
Pulse Spiral was created from a heart rate sensor, computer, DMX controller, custom software, digital dimmers, 300 incandescent lightbulbs, 3 miles of cable, and a metal platform.
Photos by Instagram photographers:
1) @velmaismysti 2) @marshallzhang 3) @robertc35 4) @marshive

Each lightbulb shows the pulse of a past participant.

Pulse Spiral by Rafael Lozano Hemmer is on display for just a few more Thursday nights (6-10pm) before the exhibit closes on 8/14/14. 

Pulse Spiral was created from a heart rate sensor, computer, DMX controller, custom software, digital dimmers, 300 incandescent lightbulbs, 3 miles of cable, and a metal platform.

Photos by Instagram photographers:

1) @velmaismysti 2) @marshallzhang 3) @robertc35 4) @marshive

Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.
Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.
Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.
Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.

Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 

http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/

Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.

We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.

It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 

Photo by Baron Wolman
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 
November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 

November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 

Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.
Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.
Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.
Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.

Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.

Light Experiments Bill Parker, Artist in Residence, 1977

Light Experiments Bill Parker, Artist in Residence, 1977