Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “exploratorium”

Early morning installation of new piles on our pier in preparation for hosting a big ship here during Fleet Week. There’ll be free public tours of the boat & local pricing for all museum visitors during Fleet Week!

First Sampling Hole in Mount Sharp 

"This image from the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the first sample-collection hole drilled in Mount Sharp, the layered mountain that is the science destination of the rover’s extended mission."source: NASA Jet Propulsion Labrotory
First Sampling Hole in Mount Sharp 
"This image from the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the first sample-collection hole drilled in Mount Sharp, the layered mountain that is the science destination of the rover’s extended mission."

source: NASA Jet Propulsion Labrotory
Would you drink out of a toilet? 
Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 
Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 
Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 

Not all shadows are black. The Colored Shadows exhibit is a discovery of the colors hidden in white light. Red, green and blue spotlights shine on a wall. The wall is white because red, blue and green light combine to make white light. These colors are often called the additive primary colors. As you walk (or dance) between the lights and the wall, your body casts three different shadows. 

“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium
“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth AsawaRuth Asawa (b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm. Photos © Exploratorium

“I am primarily interested in making it possible for people to become as independent and self-sufficient as possible. This has nothing really to do with art, except that through the arts you can learn many, many skills that you cannot learn through books and problem-solving in the abstract. A child can learn something about color, about design, and about observing objects in nature… Art will make people better, more highly skilled in thinking and improving whatever business one goes into, or whatever occupation. It makes a person broader.” – Ruth Asawa

Ruth Asawa
(b. 1926) is a Japanese-American artist who works in sculpture, painting, and drawing. In 1974, she conducted several day- and week-long sessions at the Exploratorium during which she and groups of young people made complex geometric structures with empty milk cartons. In addition, she made two beautiful panels of folded paper with black-and-white patterns.

The Tinkering Studio will host her daughter, artist Aiko Cuneo, at the next Tinkering Social Club: Milk Cartons Re(imagined) Thursday, September 25 7-9pm.

Photos © Exploratorium

Sun Swarm singing in the wind and glistening into the lens. Installation by Chris Bell, 2013.

Sun Swarm singing in the wind and glistening into the lens. Installation by Chris Bell, 2013.

Meet the Tinkerer’s Clock: a massive, whimsical, kinetically sculptural clock featuring legions of tiny tinkerers at work. British artist and tinkerer Tim Hunkin discusses the clock’s inspiration and evolution.  

Come chill with Exploratorium staff scientist Julie Yu at Helix in Los Altos. She’ll vaporize your liquid nitrogen naiveté, revealing the secret behind Dippin’ Dots as she creates DIY ice cream courtesy of -196°C. 
Friday Sept. 19, 6- 8PM
Photo by Mark Walker on PopSci.com

Come chill with Exploratorium staff scientist Julie Yu at Helix in Los Altos. She’ll vaporize your liquid nitrogen naiveté, revealing the secret behind Dippin’ Dots as she creates DIY ice cream courtesy of -196°C.

Friday Sept. 19, 6- 8PM

Photo by Mark Walker on PopSci.com

Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean
The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.
"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."

Fascinating Biology in the Caribbean


The Exploratorium is hosting a series of live webcasts from the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, which has been exploring the ocean floor and sharing its scientific discoveries live with the public around the world.

"While exploring the area off of Haiti, Navassa Island has proved to hold a wide range of interesting sea life. From sea cucumbers and sponges, to multicolored fish, the waters here are teeming with life. The ROVs have been busy collecting rock, coral, water, and push core samples, and even though this journey may be focused on geology, the biology never ceases to fascinate the scientist. Here are some of the creatures we have seen in the last few dives of the Windward Passage leg of the expedition."
Unveiled: 5 visions for landscape above Crissy Field
The “Observation Post,” includes a “learning landscape” that includes a variety of installations by the Exploratorium science museum.
Photo: Cmg, CMG

Unveiled: 5 visions for landscape above Crissy Field

The “Observation Post,” includes a “learning landscape” that includes a variety of installations by the Exploratorium science museum.

Photo: Cmg, CMG
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 
Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 

Hard day back after the long weekend? This slow moving Bay creature feels you! We caught this clam in a mud grab off Pier 15. Our Bio Lab folks separated it from the mud with a metal sieve and made video with the aid of a microscope. It is about half a centimeter long. We watched it “chill” for a little over a minute. 

The Pinscreen! Curious? Visit us at Pier 15 in San Francisco.

Shaking Shapes…

#ThrowBackThursday to the Exploratorium’s 1982 Explainers

We’re hiring High School Explainers for Fall 2014! Applications due Monday 8/25/14.

Apply here: http://explainers.exploratorium.edu/highschool/apply

Soundwave ((6)) Water, San Francisco Innovative Art + Music Biennial

Thursday, August 21, 2014 • 7:00 p.m. at the Exploratorium - Tickets & More Info

In partnership with Exploratorium Cinema Arts, Soundwave immerses visitors in a cinematic, surround-sound event exploring ideas about the ecologies, stories, and properties of our most important natural resource—water.

www.soundwavesf.com