Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “exploratorium”

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 
November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 

November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 

Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.
Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.
Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.
Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.

Highlights from this year’s Summertime Staff Picks on Instagram. Tag #exploratorium to be up for consideration! Don’t forget to follow us.

Light Experiments Bill Parker, Artist in Residence, 1977

Light Experiments Bill Parker, Artist in Residence, 1977

The first 500 digits of π are ready for you to carry in our infamous Pi Day parade kicking off at 1:45pm PDT today! The parade will reach our Pi shrine at 3.14 1:59pm PDT ;). Directly following, free pi(e) for our Free Day guests for as long as 1,500 slices goes… To the irrational, transcendental, and infinite number, Happy Pi Day, from us to you.
The first 500 digits of π are ready for you to carry in our infamous Pi Day parade kicking off at 1:45pm PDT today! The parade will reach our Pi shrine at 3.14 1:59pm PDT ;). Directly following, free pi(e) for our Free Day guests for as long as 1,500 slices goes… To the irrational, transcendental, and infinite number, Happy Pi Day, from us to you.

The first 500 digits of π are ready for you to carry in our infamous Pi Day parade kicking off at 1:45pm PDT today! The parade will reach our Pi shrine at 3.14 1:59pm PDT ;). Directly following, free pi(e) for our Free Day guests for as long as 1,500 slices goes… To the irrational, transcendental, and infinite number, Happy Pi Day, from us to you.

"Cupcake, Zucchini, Bread" A Mold Growth Rate Experiment
Photo by David Barker © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

"Cupcake, Zucchini, Bread"
A Mold Growth Rate Experiment

Photo by David Barker
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

"In the mid seventies, the Exploratorium had an early connection (via phone line) to Wordrow Wilson High School and their HP2000c computer. We had a teletype machine in the box the kids are sitting on and we used to demo the computer (programming in BASIC) to people on the [museum] floor. Frank [Oppenheimer] hated it. I loved it…" -Ron Hipschman, the Exploratorium’s original Web Master at its inception in 1993Photographer unknown.

"In the mid seventies, the Exploratorium had an early connection (via phone line) to Wordrow Wilson High School and their HP2000c computer. We had a teletype machine in the box the kids are sitting on and we used to demo the computer (programming in BASIC) to people on the [museum] floor. Frank [Oppenheimer] hated it. I loved it…" -Ron Hipschman, the Exploratorium’s original Web Master at its inception in 1993

Photographer unknown.

Pier 7 photo taken from inside the Exploratorium’s Rickshaw Obscura, a bicycle-mounted exhibit that can often be seen cruising around the perimeter of the Exploratorium campus. Flag down an Explainer and take a spin inside during your next visit. Photo by Amy Snyder© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Pier 7 photo taken from inside the Exploratorium’s Rickshaw Obscura, a bicycle-mounted exhibit that can often be seen cruising around the perimeter of the Exploratorium campus. Flag down an Explainer and take a spin inside during your next visit.

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Happy Darwin Day!  Today would have been Charles Darwin’s 205th birthday. Naturalist Charles Darwin (1809–1882) first noticed the evidence for natural selection while visiting the Galapagos Islands in 1835. On these isolated islands, Darwin found finches that resembled those living on the South American continent, some 1,300 kilometers away. But the Galapagos finches, he realized, showed a range of beak sizes that corresponded to the food sources available where they lived. Darwin concluded that these birds originated from a single species that migrated from the mainland millions of years ago. Since birds faced distinct challenges depending on where they settled, finches with different traits survived in different locations. Through the process of natural selection, the bird populations eventually split into many species, which still retaining common characteristics. Since his publication of On the Origin of Species, the principles of evolutionary biology have become integral to fields as diverse as medicine, agriculture, genetic engineering, and epidemiology. Outside the life sciences, evolutionary concepts have informed economics, cultural studies, urban planning, and even forms of popular culture like video game design. The very idea of evolutionary change over time has become ingrained across the public imagination. Thanks, and happy birthday Charles! More on Natural Selection http://www.exploratorium.edu/origins/belize-london/ideas/evolution.html

Happy Darwin Day!
Today would have been Charles Darwin’s 205th birthday.

Naturalist Charles Darwin (1809–1882) first noticed the evidence for natural selection while visiting the Galapagos Islands in 1835. On these isolated islands, Darwin found finches that resembled those living on the South American continent, some 1,300 kilometers away. But the Galapagos finches, he realized, showed a range of beak sizes that corresponded to the food sources available where they lived.

Darwin concluded that these birds originated from a single species that migrated from the mainland millions of years ago. Since birds faced distinct challenges depending on where they settled, finches with different traits survived in different locations. Through the process of natural selection, the bird populations eventually split into many species, which still retaining common characteristics.

Since his publication of On the Origin of Species, the principles of evolutionary biology have become integral to fields as diverse as medicine, agriculture, genetic engineering, and epidemiology. Outside the life sciences, evolutionary concepts have informed economics, cultural studies, urban planning, and even forms of popular culture like video game design. The very idea of evolutionary change over time has become ingrained across the public imagination. Thanks, and happy birthday Charles!

More on Natural Selection http://www.exploratorium.edu/origins/belize-london/ideas/evolution.html

Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside… Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity. Conductive Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks. Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit. You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds. Insulating Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container. Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside… Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity. Conductive Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks. Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit. You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds. Insulating Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container. Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside… Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity. Conductive Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks. Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit. You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds. Insulating Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container. Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside… Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity. Conductive Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks. Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit. You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds. Insulating Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container. Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside… Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity. Conductive Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks. Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit. You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds. Insulating Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container. Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside… Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity. Conductive Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks. Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit. You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds. Insulating Dough Recipe: Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container. Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering

Today our new book The Art of Tinkering, produced from The Tinkering Studio, is released to the public! Request it at your local book store or buy it online. Here’s a taste of what’s inside…

Did you know that playdough can be sculpted into circuits? Its saltiness makes it conductive—and you can use it to play with battery packs, LEDs, buzzers, motors, and more. Cook up some conductive dough and experiment with squishy circuits in this week’s #tinkeringtuesday activity.

Conductive Dough Recipe:

Mix 1 cup water, 1 cup flour, ¼ cup salt, 3 tablespoons cream of tartar, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, and some drops of food coloring in a pot over medium heat. Stir continuously as the mixture boils and thickens, and keep on stirring until it forms a ball in the pot’s center. Let it cool slightly and knead it on a floured surface until it’s nice and smooth. Store it in an airtight container; it will stay malleable for weeks.

Grab two lumps of conductive dough, and poke one leg of an LED into each one. Take the two leads of a battery pack and stick the positive one into the lump with the LED’s positive leg, and the negative one into the lump with the LED’s negative leg. See the light go on? That’s your first squishy circuit.

You always need a gap between your negative and positive dough lumps, so next try placing some insulating dough between them to divert electricity from the battery pack into your LED. This allows for more solid construction without any shorts. Insulating dough will also help you move on to more complex builds.

Insulating Dough Recipe:

Mix 1 cup flour, ½ cup sugar, and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil in a bowl. Then add up to ½ cup distilled water in tiny increments (about 1 tablespoon at a time) until the dough forms a cohesive lump. Knead in a little more flour until it’s easy to mold with your hands. Store in an airtight container.

Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering

Join the Exploratorium and the California King Tides Initiative in a walk to witness the last king tides in January, 2014! Meet us tomorrow, January 29, at 9am at the Exploratorium’s Wave Organ, the awesome wave-activated acoustic sculpture located at the end of a jetty in the San Francisco Bay (83 Marina Green Dr, SF, CA 94123). Walk with us from the Wave Organ to the Exploratorium at Pier 15 as we view and photograph a 7.0 ft high tide at several points along the banks of San Francisco. The walk is 3 miles from the Wave Organ, OR for a shorter 2-mile walk, meet us at the Aquatic Park Pier at 10am.We may experience some flooded roads and pathways (nothing dangerous in the weather forecast, but be sure to wear sturdy shoes and bring a jacket!). We expect this walk to be about 2.5-3 hours. This is a one-way walk so plan accordingly. Convenient public transportation exists at the end of our walk from the Exploratorium at Pier 15. We look forward to experiencing this exciting event with you all.For full details and to please RSVP, please go here: http://california.kingtides.net/2014/01/26/snap-the-tides-with-the-exploratorium-on-jan-29/
Top photo by Mark FlippoffBottom photo by John V. Gatewood
Join the Exploratorium and the California King Tides Initiative in a walk to witness the last king tides in January, 2014! Meet us tomorrow, January 29, at 9am at the Exploratorium’s Wave Organ, the awesome wave-activated acoustic sculpture located at the end of a jetty in the San Francisco Bay (83 Marina Green Dr, SF, CA 94123). Walk with us from the Wave Organ to the Exploratorium at Pier 15 as we view and photograph a 7.0 ft high tide at several points along the banks of San Francisco. The walk is 3 miles from the Wave Organ, OR for a shorter 2-mile walk, meet us at the Aquatic Park Pier at 10am.We may experience some flooded roads and pathways (nothing dangerous in the weather forecast, but be sure to wear sturdy shoes and bring a jacket!). We expect this walk to be about 2.5-3 hours. This is a one-way walk so plan accordingly. Convenient public transportation exists at the end of our walk from the Exploratorium at Pier 15. We look forward to experiencing this exciting event with you all.For full details and to please RSVP, please go here: http://california.kingtides.net/2014/01/26/snap-the-tides-with-the-exploratorium-on-jan-29/
Top photo by Mark FlippoffBottom photo by John V. Gatewood

Join the Exploratorium and the California King Tides Initiative in a walk to witness the last king tides in January, 2014! Meet us tomorrow, January 29, at 9am at the Exploratorium’s Wave Organ, the awesome wave-activated acoustic sculpture located at the end of a jetty in the San Francisco Bay (83 Marina Green Dr, SF, CA 94123). Walk with us from the Wave Organ to the Exploratorium at Pier 15 as we view and photograph a 7.0 ft high tide at several points along the banks of San Francisco. The walk is 3 miles from the Wave Organ, OR for a shorter 2-mile walk, meet us at the Aquatic Park Pier at 10am.

We may experience some flooded roads and pathways (nothing dangerous in the weather forecast, but be sure to wear sturdy shoes and bring a jacket!). We expect this walk to be about 2.5-3 hours. This is a one-way walk so plan accordingly. Convenient public transportation exists at the end of our walk from the Exploratorium at Pier 15. We look forward to experiencing this exciting event with you all.

For full details and to please RSVP, please go here: http://california.kingtides.net/2014/01/26/snap-the-tides-with-the-exploratorium-on-jan-29/

Top photo by Mark Flippoff
Bottom photo by John V. Gatewood

Still winter waters make nice reflections.
Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Still winter waters make nice reflections.

Photo by Amy Snyder

© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Did you know that the Rosetta Mission spacecraft is due to be “woken up” on Monday, January 20th? (How cool is that?!) It has been in space for nearly 12 years, orbiting Earth, Mars, and some asteroids, and collecting loads of data since the European Space Agency launched it in 2004. Then in June of 2011, it went into deep space hibernation-mode….  Join Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Isabel Hawkins for a LIVE webcast on the Rosetta Mission TODAY, Saturday, January 18 at 1pm. Learn details of the mission as it continues on its journey to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will make the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted. Rosetta will follow the comet on its journey through the inner solar system, measuring the increase in activity as the sun warms its icy surface. The first images of the comet are expected in May.  Watch live on Explo.tv: http://www.exploratorium.edu/tv/?project=115&program=1477&type=webcast

Did you know that the Rosetta Mission spacecraft is due to be “woken up” on Monday, January 20th? (How cool is that?!) It has been in space for nearly 12 years, orbiting Earth, Mars, and some asteroids, and collecting loads of data since the European Space Agency launched it in 2004. Then in June of 2011, it went into deep space hibernation-mode….

Join Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Isabel Hawkins for a LIVE webcast on the Rosetta Mission TODAY, Saturday, January 18 at 1pm. Learn details of the mission as it continues on its journey to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will make the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted. Rosetta will follow the comet on its journey through the inner solar system, measuring the increase in activity as the sun warms its icy surface. The first images of the comet are expected in May.

Watch live on Explo.tv: http://www.exploratorium.edu/tv/?project=115&program=1477&type=webcast

Jump into the interactive installation Comfort Zone with LEVYdance at the Exploratorium every Thursday night through the end of January!Explore Comfort Zone, an interactive installation that integrates choreography into a virtual experience. The installation invites visitors to use their own bodies to playfully explore group dynamics, choice, and social boundaries. Visitors can experiment with movement, posture, mood, and social interaction to collectively and playfully explore the edges of their own comfort zones.http://vimeo.com/83807989?utm_source=January+2014+Newsletter&utm_campaign=January+Newsletter+2014&utm_medium=email
Jump into the interactive installation Comfort Zone with LEVYdance at the Exploratorium every Thursday night through the end of January!Explore Comfort Zone, an interactive installation that integrates choreography into a virtual experience. The installation invites visitors to use their own bodies to playfully explore group dynamics, choice, and social boundaries. Visitors can experiment with movement, posture, mood, and social interaction to collectively and playfully explore the edges of their own comfort zones.http://vimeo.com/83807989?utm_source=January+2014+Newsletter&utm_campaign=January+Newsletter+2014&utm_medium=email
Jump into the interactive installation Comfort Zone with LEVYdance at the Exploratorium every Thursday night through the end of January!Explore Comfort Zone, an interactive installation that integrates choreography into a virtual experience. The installation invites visitors to use their own bodies to playfully explore group dynamics, choice, and social boundaries. Visitors can experiment with movement, posture, mood, and social interaction to collectively and playfully explore the edges of their own comfort zones.http://vimeo.com/83807989?utm_source=January+2014+Newsletter&utm_campaign=January+Newsletter+2014&utm_medium=email
Jump into the interactive installation Comfort Zone with LEVYdance at the Exploratorium every Thursday night through the end of January!Explore Comfort Zone, an interactive installation that integrates choreography into a virtual experience. The installation invites visitors to use their own bodies to playfully explore group dynamics, choice, and social boundaries. Visitors can experiment with movement, posture, mood, and social interaction to collectively and playfully explore the edges of their own comfort zones.http://vimeo.com/83807989?utm_source=January+2014+Newsletter&utm_campaign=January+Newsletter+2014&utm_medium=email
Jump into the interactive installation Comfort Zone with LEVYdance at the Exploratorium every Thursday night through the end of January!Explore Comfort Zone, an interactive installation that integrates choreography into a virtual experience. The installation invites visitors to use their own bodies to playfully explore group dynamics, choice, and social boundaries. Visitors can experiment with movement, posture, mood, and social interaction to collectively and playfully explore the edges of their own comfort zones.http://vimeo.com/83807989?utm_source=January+2014+Newsletter&utm_campaign=January+Newsletter+2014&utm_medium=email

Jump into the interactive installation Comfort Zone with LEVYdance at the Exploratorium every Thursday night through the end of January!

Explore Comfort Zone, an interactive installation that integrates choreography into a virtual experience. The installation invites visitors to use their own bodies to playfully explore group dynamics, choice, and social boundaries. Visitors can experiment with movement, posture, mood, and social interaction to collectively and playfully explore the edges of their own comfort zones.

http://vimeo.com/83807989?utm_source=January+2014+Newsletter&utm_campaign=January+Newsletter+2014&utm_medium=email

Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering
Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesdayWorking out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering

Learn how the Cardboard Institute of Technology (CIT) constructs disposable multiverses. #tinkeringtuesday

Working out of a huge, shared warehouse space on Treasure Island in the San Francisco Bay, CIT builds sprawling mythologies and microworlds out of scavenged cardboard and hot glue (bought in 20 lb. boxes).

Working collaboratively as well as on their own, members of this apocalypse-embracing, power-to-the-people artists’ collective create immersive, interactive installations of all kinds—from pirate ships to galaxies—but one element that always seems to recur is what they call a shantytown: a cluster of endearing, sloppily constructed cardboard houses.

To make your own shanty, start with a strip of cardboard and score its sides to create a box shape. Use a box cutter to make holes for windows and doors.

Hot-glue your box closed. Cut another piece of cardboard into a roof shape and glue it to the walls at a sloping angle. Peel back the paper to reveal the reinforcing strips below for a corrugated metal effect. You can repurpose the topsheet by rolling it into a chimney.

Try adding wings, porches, decks, etc. Build houses of various sizes, and arrange them in a chockablock configuration for an authentic urban feel.

Want more details or suggestions? This activity and over 150 more from artists and tinkerers are featured for you to try yourself in The Art of Tinkering, available now at http://tinkering.exploratorium.edu/the-art-of-tinkering