Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “science”

It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 
Photo by Baron Wolman© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

It’s Thursday, so that means we have to throwback. Here’s an early Exploratorium exhibition, “Limbic System” by artist Tad Bridenthal. Visitors crawled into an infinitely reflecting, dodecahedron sculpture. Each of the twelve sides and twenty vertices featured colored lights and mirrors. We think it was up around 1971. The last shot is of the exterior. 

Photo by Baron Wolman
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

angulargeometry:

Together We Are Stronger.

angulargeometry:

Together We Are Stronger.

(via mashable)

Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 
Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”

Take a close look at some funky fungi. Recently MycoWorks shared their mycelium-driven sustainable design solutions on our Pier 15 Plaza. 

Mycotecture, a term coined by Philip Ross in 2007, is architecture grown from mushroom mycelium - the vegetative part fungus, sometimes underground and unseen. Similar to synthetic open-cell foams such as polystyrene, Mycelium materials are compostable and can serve carbon-sequestering. Myco-Works is developing ”standards for mycelium composites and their application as energy- and cost-efficient alternatives to synthetic polymer materials.”
xysciences:

Video of the rotating comet ‘67P’.
The ESA’s (European Space Agency’s) Rosetta Probe will be reaching this comet soon to orbit it and take measurements. 

Landing on that thing doesn’t look easy! Watch our last webcast on the Rosetta Mission and learn about the probe’s final approach maneuvers! 

xysciences:

Video of the rotating comet ‘67P’.

The ESA’s (European Space Agency’s) Rosetta Probe will be reaching this comet soon to orbit it and take measurements. 

Landing on that thing doesn’t look easy! Watch our last webcast on the Rosetta Mission and learn about the probe’s final approach maneuvers! 

xysciences:

How a key works.

xysciences:

How a key works.

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

Mars. We’re going.
openwebart:

Gentle Brain by Eugene Krivoruchko is “an interactive piece about the fleeting nature of digital pleasures.”  It is written in Processing and brought to the browser with processingjs.  See the code here. Finding the work in a news feed makes the piece all the more compelling.

We know the feeling!

openwebart:

Gentle Brain by Eugene Krivoruchko is “an interactive piece about the fleeting nature of digital pleasures.”  It is written in Processing and brought to the browser with processingjs.  See the code here. Finding the work in a news feed makes the piece all the more compelling.

We know the feeling!

(via techmattersyes)

November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 
November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 

November 2009, After Dark. Particle physicist Dr. Austin Richards — aka Dr. Megavolt — jousted with a high-voltage Tesla coil, which generated 200,000 volts of electricity and shot 14-foot-long arcs of lightning through the air. Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium 

Mission to Mars! It’s no longer just fodder for Science Fiction.Join us for another exciting episode of our online video series, Science in the City, and learn about the latest developments on Sending Humans to Mars! 
Mission to Mars! It’s no longer just fodder for Science Fiction.Join us for another exciting episode of our online video series, Science in the City, and learn about the latest developments on Sending Humans to Mars! 

Mission to Mars! It’s no longer just fodder for Science Fiction.

Join us for another exciting episode of our online video series, Science in the City, and learn about the latest developments on Sending Humans to Mars

Our Tinkering Studio is hosting an ASTC Community of Practice Hangout (CoP) about Chain Reactions Thursday, July 10th at 11PST. All are welcome. Join the conversation online and RSVP here to reserve your spot. 
Above: Whimsical, fun, and founded in chain reactions; Rube Goldberg’s Professor Butts and Self-Operating Napkin.

Our Tinkering Studio is hosting an ASTC Community of Practice Hangout (CoP) about Chain Reactions Thursday, July 10th at 11PST. All are welcome. Join the conversation online and RSVP here to reserve your spot. 

Above: Whimsical, fun, and founded in chain reactions; Rube Goldberg’s Professor Butts and Self-Operating Napkin.

Video by @maddmitry

These sweet, blinking cuties remind us of our special “Owls | Science in the City" from a few years back!

image

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman

Come ooooo and ahhhh at the science behind these big booms! Where do fireworks come from? Who invented them? What causes their beautiful colors, and how do the bursting shells create such different patterns? Join us for some real illumination, and learn the difference between a jerb and a lance. See the promo video here.

Thursday, June 26, 2014 • 8:00 p.m.

Light Experiments Bill Parker, Artist in Residence, 1977

Light Experiments Bill Parker, Artist in Residence, 1977

FROGS! They provided us with the first reliable pregnancy tests, donned rubber pants in the name of research (amphibian prophylactics), and appeared in many high school biology dissections (RIP). Here our Microscope Imaging Station highlights fertilization and cell division - two stages of the Xenopus Laevis or African clawed frog development. Can you spot the unfertilized egg in the first image? Image by Thierry Brassac© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu
FROGS! They provided us with the first reliable pregnancy tests, donned rubber pants in the name of research (amphibian prophylactics), and appeared in many high school biology dissections (RIP). Here our Microscope Imaging Station highlights fertilization and cell division - two stages of the Xenopus Laevis or African clawed frog development. Can you spot the unfertilized egg in the first image? Image by Thierry Brassac© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

FROGS! They provided us with the first reliable pregnancy tests, donned rubber pants in the name of research (amphibian prophylactics), and appeared in many high school biology dissections (RIP). Here our Microscope Imaging Station highlights fertilization and cell division - two stages of the Xenopus Laevis or African clawed frog development. 

Can you spot the unfertilized egg in the first image? 

Image by Thierry Brassac
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu