Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “snow”

glacierworks:

We’re blushing…
geologise:

One Of The Most Amazing Photos You Will Ever See
Many, like myself, want to explore our natural world. The famous Mount Everest is known by all, so what if you could really explore the scenery in great detail without leaving your computer? Luckily for us all, David Breashears has captured a massive and extremely detailed interactive photo of Everest and the Khumbu glacier for our viewing enjoyment.
Not only can you study beautiful geological formations like strata and ductile deformation, but you can also even see climbers as they travel one of the most dangerous places on Earth.
The click through link and source will send you right to the interactive photo, where you can zoom in, look for climbers, study the landscape, and just admire the beauty of this photograph. Hundreds of photos were stitched together to create the image. Here is their description on the website:



“This gigapixel image of the Khumbu glacier was captured by David Breashears during the spring of 2012, from the Pumori viewpoint near Mount Everest. The Khumbu Icefall is clearly visible here, and one can easily see the hustle and bustle of Everest Base Camp below.”



www.glacierworks.org is a stunning website with much more to offer. There are other interactive photos from different locations, and their mission statement is to study the growing changes in the Himalayas.
As I explore their website, I found they even have a Tumblr! You can follow updates right from your dashboard, but I suggest to really explore the website, as it is full of amazing imagery (even 360°!) that takes a lot of skill to capture.
You can follow them on: Facebook, Tumblr, Google+, Twitter, Website

glacierworks:

We’re blushing…

geologise:

One Of The Most Amazing Photos You Will Ever See

Many, like myself, want to explore our natural world. The famous Mount Everest is known by all, so what if you could really explore the scenery in great detail without leaving your computer? Luckily for us all, David Breashears has captured a massive and extremely detailed interactive photo of Everest and the Khumbu glacier for our viewing enjoyment.

Not only can you study beautiful geological formations like strata and ductile deformation, but you can also even see climbers as they travel one of the most dangerous places on Earth.

The click through link and source will send you right to the interactive photo, where you can zoom in, look for climbers, study the landscape, and just admire the beauty of this photograph. Hundreds of photos were stitched together to create the image. Here is their description on the website:

“This gigapixel image of the Khumbu glacier was captured by David Breashears during the spring of 2012, from the Pumori viewpoint near Mount Everest. The Khumbu Icefall is clearly visible here, and one can easily see the hustle and bustle of Everest Base Camp below.”

www.glacierworks.org is a stunning website with much more to offer. There are other interactive photos from different locations, and their mission statement is to study the growing changes in the Himalayas.

As I explore their website, I found they even have a Tumblr! You can follow updates right from your dashboard, but I suggest to really explore the website, as it is full of amazing imagery (even 360°!) that takes a lot of skill to capture.

You can follow them on: Facebook, Tumblr, Google+, Twitter, Website

Snowy Bits

Melting snow and ice on a car windshield at Lake Tahoe. #noticing
Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Snowy Bits

Melting snow and ice on a car windshield at Lake Tahoe. #noticing

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.
nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.
nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.
nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.
nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.
nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.
nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN
the-star-stuff:


Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes
Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.

nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN

the-star-stuff:

Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes

Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.

(via 1afterimage1)

As we celebrate all that our community has accomplished over the past 43 years and all we have to look forward to in the years to come, we’re grateful for you—our extended Exploratorium family and friends. We couldn’t have grown the Exploratorium into what it is today without your dedication, commitment, and support. The new year promises to be an exciting one, and we’re thrilled to take this next step into our future at the piers with you.

From all of us at the Exploratorium, we offer our warmest wishes for a joyful holiday season and a very happy new year.

Sincerely,

Dennis M. Bartels, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Exploratorium