Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “space”

First Sampling Hole in Mount Sharp 

"This image from the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the first sample-collection hole drilled in Mount Sharp, the layered mountain that is the science destination of the rover’s extended mission."source: NASA Jet Propulsion Labrotory
First Sampling Hole in Mount Sharp 
"This image from the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover shows the first sample-collection hole drilled in Mount Sharp, the layered mountain that is the science destination of the rover’s extended mission."

source: NASA Jet Propulsion Labrotory

The Known Universe from AMNH on Vimeo.

The Known Universe by the American Museum of Natural History. This video will take you on a journey to the end of time and space as we know it.

"Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History.” 








Milky Way over Yellowstone Image Credit & Copyright: Dave Lane
The Milky Way was not created by an evaporating lake. The colorful pool of water, about 10 meters across, is known as Silex Spring and is located in Yellowstone National Park inWyoming, USA. Source: NASA, Astronomy Pic of the Day.

Milky Way over Yellowstone 
Image Credit & Copyright: Dave Lane

The Milky Way was not created by an evaporating lake. The colorful pool of water, about 10 meters across, is known as Silex Spring and is located in Yellowstone National Park inWyomingUSA.

Source:
NASA, Astronomy Pic of the Day.

txchnologist:

To celebrate the 15th anniversary of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, four new images of supernova remnants are being released. These spectacular cosmic vistas are the glowing debris fields that were created when massive stars exploded at the ends of their lives.
Chandra, one of NASA’s current “Great Observatories,” along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions of the universe. It obits up to 86,500 miles above the Earth.
To celebrate Chandra’s 15th anniversary, four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – were released by the space agency. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra to capture them in exquisite detail. See a larger version here.
Courtesy NASA.
Read More

txchnologist:

To celebrate the 15th anniversary of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, four new images of supernova remnants are being released. These spectacular cosmic vistas are the glowing debris fields that were created when massive stars exploded at the ends of their lives.

Chandra, one of NASA’s current “Great Observatories,” along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions of the universe. It obits up to 86,500 miles above the Earth.

To celebrate Chandra’s 15th anniversary, four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – were released by the space agency. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra to capture them in exquisite detail. See a larger version here.

Courtesy NASA.

Read More

(via science-junkie)

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

Behind the scenes at the Exploratorium staff offices, you’ll find curious artifacts like this. This guy has travelled with us from the vaults of our old location to Pier 15. Rumor has it that it’s an original NASA early-Apollo era demo suit!

Mars. We’re going.
Did you know that the Rosetta Mission spacecraft is due to be “woken up” on Monday, January 20th? (How cool is that?!) It has been in space for nearly 12 years, orbiting Earth, Mars, and some asteroids, and collecting loads of data since the European Space Agency launched it in 2004. Then in June of 2011, it went into deep space hibernation-mode….  Join Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Isabel Hawkins for a LIVE webcast on the Rosetta Mission TODAY, Saturday, January 18 at 1pm. Learn details of the mission as it continues on its journey to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will make the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted. Rosetta will follow the comet on its journey through the inner solar system, measuring the increase in activity as the sun warms its icy surface. The first images of the comet are expected in May.  Watch live on Explo.tv: http://www.exploratorium.edu/tv/?project=115&program=1477&type=webcast

Did you know that the Rosetta Mission spacecraft is due to be “woken up” on Monday, January 20th? (How cool is that?!) It has been in space for nearly 12 years, orbiting Earth, Mars, and some asteroids, and collecting loads of data since the European Space Agency launched it in 2004. Then in June of 2011, it went into deep space hibernation-mode….

Join Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Isabel Hawkins for a LIVE webcast on the Rosetta Mission TODAY, Saturday, January 18 at 1pm. Learn details of the mission as it continues on its journey to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will make the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted. Rosetta will follow the comet on its journey through the inner solar system, measuring the increase in activity as the sun warms its icy surface. The first images of the comet are expected in May.

Watch live on Explo.tv: http://www.exploratorium.edu/tv/?project=115&program=1477&type=webcast

Exploratorium Picks:2013 Year in Science Stories From the “shmeaty” goodness of a test-tube hamburger to the glimmer of water on Mars, it’s been a year in science to remember—and in some cases (yep, we’re talking to you, comet ISON) to forget. Here are some of our picks for the year in science. We’ll share one of our top science stories each day of the first week of 2014. See them all at #2013SciencePicks.6. Comet ISON FlybyInbound from the mysterious Oort cloud near the boundary of our solar system, comet ISON promised to (possibly) light up the December sky with a dazzling day-visible display. Alas, hype and hyperbole provided most of the entertainment, as the actual performance fizzled when the comet broke into bits after performing a hairpin turn around the sun. Astronomers were nonetheless pleased by the dazzling data payload.http://www.nasa.gov/ison/

Exploratorium Picks:

2013 Year in Science Stories


From the “shmeaty” goodness of a test-tube hamburger to the glimmer of water on Mars, it’s been a year in science to remember—and in some cases (yep, we’re talking to you, comet ISON) to forget. Here are some of our picks for the year in science. We’ll share one of our top science stories each day of the first week of 2014. See them all at #2013SciencePicks.

6. Comet ISON Flyby

Inbound from the mysterious Oort cloud near the boundary of our solar system, comet ISON promised to (possibly) light up the December sky with a dazzling day-visible display. Alas, hype and hyperbole provided most of the entertainment, as the actual performance fizzled when the comet broke into bits after performing a hairpin turn around the sun. Astronomers were nonetheless pleased by the dazzling data payload.
http://www.nasa.gov/ison/

Hello Explonauts, Astronomy on the Terrace TONIGHT! Great chance to see the International Space Station tonight at 5:40pm PST. Here’s a map that should help you find it.  Also, on the Exploratorium’s terrace tonight after 8pm, we’ll have a telescope out observing Jupiter which will have shadow on its surface from its moon, Io. Our moon will also be bright and an easy target. Maybe we will see the Rupes Recta?! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rupes_Recta) Bonus! Early (and bright) Geminid meteors should be visible too. Bring a warm hat and hot bevvy.

Hello Explonauts,

Astronomy on the Terrace TONIGHT! Great chance to see the International Space Station tonight at 5:40pm PST. Here’s a map that should help you find it.

Also, on the Exploratorium’s terrace tonight after 8pm, we’ll have a telescope out observing Jupiter which will have shadow on its surface from its moon, Io.

Our moon will also be bright and an easy target. Maybe we will see the Rupes Recta?! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rupes_Recta)

Bonus! Early (and bright) Geminid meteors should be visible too. Bring a warm hat and hot bevvy.

The Voyager-1 spacecraft has become the first manmade object to leave the Solar System!
[Remember? Both Voyager 1 and 2 carry the Golden Record… http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/goldenrec.html]
Scientists say the probe’s instruments indicate it has moved beyond the bubble of hot gas from our Sun and is now moving in the space between the stars.
Launched in 1977, Voyager was sent initially to study the outer planets, but then just kept on going. Voyager will live out its days circling the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy
(Continue reading the full article via BBC News - Voyager probe ‘leaves Solar System’)

The Voyager-1 spacecraft has become the first manmade object to leave the Solar System!

[Remember? Both Voyager 1 and 2 carry the Golden Record… http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/goldenrec.html]

Scientists say the probe’s instruments indicate it has moved beyond the bubble of hot gas from our Sun and is now moving in the space between the stars.

Launched in 1977, Voyager was sent initially to study the outer planets, but then just kept on going. Voyager will live out its days circling the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy

(Continue reading the full article via BBC News - Voyager probe ‘leaves Solar System’)

Mars Update: Feb. 2013 | Return to Mars | Exploratorium TV

On Mars, as on Earth, sometimes things can take on an unusual appearance. A case in point is a shiny-looking rock seen in a recent image from NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover. Join us live, online tomorrow, February 20, 2013, at 4:00p.m. PST to learn about Curiosity’s latest findings.

Eagerly anticipating the Curiosity Mars Rover’s first drilling maneuvers. This will also be the first time any robot has drilled into rock to COLLECT SAMPLES FROM MARS! (via NASA - Curiosity Maneuver Prepares for Drilling)

Eagerly anticipating the Curiosity Mars Rover’s first drilling maneuvers. This will also be the first time any robot has drilled into rock to COLLECT SAMPLES FROM MARS! (via NASA - Curiosity Maneuver Prepares for Drilling)

infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.
Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

infinity-imagined:

City lights photographed from the International Space Station and Neurons imaged with fluorescence microscopy.

Source images; Cities (1) (2) (3) (4) (5), Neurons (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

sagansense:

Yearlong Space Missions Will Present Physical and Mental Challenges
image 1: This picture of the International Space Station and the moon was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis just after the two spacecraft undocked on July 19, 2011, during NASA’s final shuttle mission STS-135.image 2: Expedition 26 Commander Scott Kelly wears a blue wrist band that has a peace symbol, a heart and the word “Gabby” to show his love of his sister-in-law U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as he rests shortly after he and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexander Kaleri landed in their Soyuz TMA-01M capsule in Kazakhstan on March 16, 2011.image 3: Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, Expedition 23 flight engineer, is pictured near fresh tomatoes floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station in May 2010.
NASA is getting ready to send astronauts on yearlong missions to the International Space Station, doubling the duration of a typical orbital stay. These long-term missions will be sending spaceflyers into largely uncharted territory, and some of the biggest unknowns are how the human mind and body will react to that much time in space.NASA has long known that weightlessness wreaks havoc on the body, with astronauts losing muscle mass and bone density, and even suffering eyesight degeneration, after spending time in space. “While it’s definitely new territory for NASA, I wouldn’t expect the challenges of a yearlong mission to be substantially different from those of a six-month mission,” said former space station commander Michael Lopez-Alegria, who is now president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “A yearlong mission will be beneficial to Human Research Program scientists as they continue to expand the envelope of human spaceflight so that one day we can undertake the longer missions that we think will be necessary to voyage beyond cis-lunar space,” or the region between Earth and the moon.
Another health risk associated with spaceflight is radiation: Beyond the protective confines of Earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to potentially dangerous radiation from the sun, and the longer they spend in space, the more radiation they receive.
And the health risks are just one side of the challenge. Psychologically, the isolation and confinement of life on the space station can be tough to deal with as well.
Though exercise machines installed on the space station can mitigate the body issues, and phone calls and emails home can help the mind, both of these problems should be more severe for crews spending twice the normal mission length in orbit.
“For the crew, the biggest challenge would be psycho-social,” another former space station commander, Leroy Chiao, wrote in an email. “It is difficult to be away for a long period of time. Fortunately, the ISS features excellent communication tools for crews to keep in touch with friends and loved ones.”
Though some cosmonauts spent a year or longer on previous space missions to the Russian Mir station, no one has ever lived for a year at the International Space Station. The first ISS yearlong crew will be NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, who are due to launch in 2015.
Kelly, a former U.S. Navy test pilot with combat experience, said he thinks he’s up to the challenge.
“We have a really good group of people here, the behavioral health and performance group, that works with us to try to mitigate the psychological impact of being away from home and isolated for a long time,” Kelly told SPACE.com during an interview earlier this month. “I kind of recognize what I need in that regard and what I can do to make it better.”
And as for the risk to his bodily health, Kelly said he’s prepared to take it on.
“I’m not a big worrier, but I certainly understand that there is more risk,” he said. “But in anything I’ve done throughout my career — flying aircraft as a test pilot — there’s risk and reward, and you have to weigh the risks, and I think it’s worth it.”
sagansense:

Yearlong Space Missions Will Present Physical and Mental Challenges
image 1: This picture of the International Space Station and the moon was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis just after the two spacecraft undocked on July 19, 2011, during NASA’s final shuttle mission STS-135.image 2: Expedition 26 Commander Scott Kelly wears a blue wrist band that has a peace symbol, a heart and the word “Gabby” to show his love of his sister-in-law U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as he rests shortly after he and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexander Kaleri landed in their Soyuz TMA-01M capsule in Kazakhstan on March 16, 2011.image 3: Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, Expedition 23 flight engineer, is pictured near fresh tomatoes floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station in May 2010.
NASA is getting ready to send astronauts on yearlong missions to the International Space Station, doubling the duration of a typical orbital stay. These long-term missions will be sending spaceflyers into largely uncharted territory, and some of the biggest unknowns are how the human mind and body will react to that much time in space.NASA has long known that weightlessness wreaks havoc on the body, with astronauts losing muscle mass and bone density, and even suffering eyesight degeneration, after spending time in space. “While it’s definitely new territory for NASA, I wouldn’t expect the challenges of a yearlong mission to be substantially different from those of a six-month mission,” said former space station commander Michael Lopez-Alegria, who is now president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “A yearlong mission will be beneficial to Human Research Program scientists as they continue to expand the envelope of human spaceflight so that one day we can undertake the longer missions that we think will be necessary to voyage beyond cis-lunar space,” or the region between Earth and the moon.
Another health risk associated with spaceflight is radiation: Beyond the protective confines of Earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to potentially dangerous radiation from the sun, and the longer they spend in space, the more radiation they receive.
And the health risks are just one side of the challenge. Psychologically, the isolation and confinement of life on the space station can be tough to deal with as well.
Though exercise machines installed on the space station can mitigate the body issues, and phone calls and emails home can help the mind, both of these problems should be more severe for crews spending twice the normal mission length in orbit.
“For the crew, the biggest challenge would be psycho-social,” another former space station commander, Leroy Chiao, wrote in an email. “It is difficult to be away for a long period of time. Fortunately, the ISS features excellent communication tools for crews to keep in touch with friends and loved ones.”
Though some cosmonauts spent a year or longer on previous space missions to the Russian Mir station, no one has ever lived for a year at the International Space Station. The first ISS yearlong crew will be NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, who are due to launch in 2015.
Kelly, a former U.S. Navy test pilot with combat experience, said he thinks he’s up to the challenge.
“We have a really good group of people here, the behavioral health and performance group, that works with us to try to mitigate the psychological impact of being away from home and isolated for a long time,” Kelly told SPACE.com during an interview earlier this month. “I kind of recognize what I need in that regard and what I can do to make it better.”
And as for the risk to his bodily health, Kelly said he’s prepared to take it on.
“I’m not a big worrier, but I certainly understand that there is more risk,” he said. “But in anything I’ve done throughout my career — flying aircraft as a test pilot — there’s risk and reward, and you have to weigh the risks, and I think it’s worth it.”
sagansense:

Yearlong Space Missions Will Present Physical and Mental Challenges
image 1: This picture of the International Space Station and the moon was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis just after the two spacecraft undocked on July 19, 2011, during NASA’s final shuttle mission STS-135.image 2: Expedition 26 Commander Scott Kelly wears a blue wrist band that has a peace symbol, a heart and the word “Gabby” to show his love of his sister-in-law U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as he rests shortly after he and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexander Kaleri landed in their Soyuz TMA-01M capsule in Kazakhstan on March 16, 2011.image 3: Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, Expedition 23 flight engineer, is pictured near fresh tomatoes floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station in May 2010.
NASA is getting ready to send astronauts on yearlong missions to the International Space Station, doubling the duration of a typical orbital stay. These long-term missions will be sending spaceflyers into largely uncharted territory, and some of the biggest unknowns are how the human mind and body will react to that much time in space.NASA has long known that weightlessness wreaks havoc on the body, with astronauts losing muscle mass and bone density, and even suffering eyesight degeneration, after spending time in space. “While it’s definitely new territory for NASA, I wouldn’t expect the challenges of a yearlong mission to be substantially different from those of a six-month mission,” said former space station commander Michael Lopez-Alegria, who is now president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “A yearlong mission will be beneficial to Human Research Program scientists as they continue to expand the envelope of human spaceflight so that one day we can undertake the longer missions that we think will be necessary to voyage beyond cis-lunar space,” or the region between Earth and the moon.
Another health risk associated with spaceflight is radiation: Beyond the protective confines of Earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to potentially dangerous radiation from the sun, and the longer they spend in space, the more radiation they receive.
And the health risks are just one side of the challenge. Psychologically, the isolation and confinement of life on the space station can be tough to deal with as well.
Though exercise machines installed on the space station can mitigate the body issues, and phone calls and emails home can help the mind, both of these problems should be more severe for crews spending twice the normal mission length in orbit.
“For the crew, the biggest challenge would be psycho-social,” another former space station commander, Leroy Chiao, wrote in an email. “It is difficult to be away for a long period of time. Fortunately, the ISS features excellent communication tools for crews to keep in touch with friends and loved ones.”
Though some cosmonauts spent a year or longer on previous space missions to the Russian Mir station, no one has ever lived for a year at the International Space Station. The first ISS yearlong crew will be NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, who are due to launch in 2015.
Kelly, a former U.S. Navy test pilot with combat experience, said he thinks he’s up to the challenge.
“We have a really good group of people here, the behavioral health and performance group, that works with us to try to mitigate the psychological impact of being away from home and isolated for a long time,” Kelly told SPACE.com during an interview earlier this month. “I kind of recognize what I need in that regard and what I can do to make it better.”
And as for the risk to his bodily health, Kelly said he’s prepared to take it on.
“I’m not a big worrier, but I certainly understand that there is more risk,” he said. “But in anything I’ve done throughout my career — flying aircraft as a test pilot — there’s risk and reward, and you have to weigh the risks, and I think it’s worth it.”

sagansense:

Yearlong Space Missions Will Present Physical and Mental Challenges

image 1: This picture of the International Space Station and the moon was photographed from the space shuttle Atlantis just after the two spacecraft undocked on July 19, 2011, during NASA’s final shuttle mission STS-135.
image 2: Expedition 26 Commander Scott Kelly wears a blue wrist band that has a peace symbol, a heart and the word “Gabby” to show his love of his sister-in-law U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords as he rests shortly after he and cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka and Alexander Kaleri landed in their Soyuz TMA-01M capsule in Kazakhstan on March 16, 2011.
image 3: Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, Expedition 23 flight engineer, is pictured near fresh tomatoes floating freely in the Unity node of the International Space Station in May 2010.

NASA is getting ready to send astronauts on yearlong missions to the International Space Station, doubling the duration of a typical orbital stay. These long-term missions will be sending spaceflyers into largely uncharted territory, and some of the biggest unknowns are how the human mind and body will react to that much time in space.

NASA has long known that weightlessness wreaks havoc on the body, with astronauts losing muscle mass and bone density, and even suffering eyesight degeneration, after spending time in space.

“While it’s definitely new territory for NASA, I wouldn’t expect the challenges of a yearlong mission to be substantially different from those of a six-month mission,” said former space station commander Michael Lopez-Alegria, who is now president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. “A yearlong mission will be beneficial to Human Research Program scientists as they continue to expand the envelope of human spaceflight so that one day we can undertake the longer missions that we think will be necessary to voyage beyond cis-lunar space,” or the region between Earth and the moon.

Another health risk associated with spaceflight is radiation: Beyond the protective confines of Earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to potentially dangerous radiation from the sun, and the longer they spend in space, the more radiation they receive.

And the health risks are just one side of the challenge. Psychologically, the isolation and confinement of life on the space station can be tough to deal with as well.

Though exercise machines installed on the space station can mitigate the body issues, and phone calls and emails home can help the mind, both of these problems should be more severe for crews spending twice the normal mission length in orbit.

“For the crew, the biggest challenge would be psycho-social,” another former space station commander, Leroy Chiao, wrote in an email. “It is difficult to be away for a long period of time. Fortunately, the ISS features excellent communication tools for crews to keep in touch with friends and loved ones.”

Though some cosmonauts spent a year or longer on previous space missions to the Russian Mir station, no one has ever lived for a year at the International Space Station. The first ISS yearlong crew will be NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, who are due to launch in 2015.

Kelly, a former U.S. Navy test pilot with combat experience, said he thinks he’s up to the challenge.

“We have a really good group of people here, the behavioral health and performance group, that works with us to try to mitigate the psychological impact of being away from home and isolated for a long time,” Kelly told SPACE.com during an interview earlier this month. “I kind of recognize what I need in that regard and what I can do to make it better.”

And as for the risk to his bodily health, Kelly said he’s prepared to take it on.

“I’m not a big worrier, but I certainly understand that there is more risk,” he said. “But in anything I’ve done throughout my career — flying aircraft as a test pilot — there’s risk and reward, and you have to weigh the risks, and I think it’s worth it.”