Exploratorium

Exploratorium

Posts tagged “water”

Sun Swarm singing in the wind and glistening into the lens. Installation by Chris Bell, 2013.

Sun Swarm singing in the wind and glistening into the lens. Installation by Chris Bell, 2013.

The color of water. 
Photo by Instagram photographer @startafire.
Exhibit at the Exploratorium.

The color of water.

Photo by Instagram photographer @startafire.

Exhibit at the Exploratorium.

Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.
Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.
Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.
Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 
http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/
Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.
We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.

Our carbon buoy gets a makeover: 

http://blogs.exploratorium.edu/fluidplanet/

Since the Exploratorium opened at its waterfront location more than a year ago, we’ve been engaged in a unique experiment with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA’s  Pacific Marine Environmental Lab in Seattle lent us a beautiful ocean buoy, outfitted with instruments to measure carbon in the ocean and atmosphere. For the last 15 months, it’s been bobbing in all its white and red glory in the lagoon between Piers 15 and 17, occasionally surrounded by mist from the fog bridge art piece.

We’ve reached a milestone with the experiment, the first time we’ve pulled the buoy out of the water for maintenance. It’s a complex choreography of forklift, mobile crane and a balky metal watercraft dubbed “the angry bathtub” to lift the one ton buoy from the water onto our outdoor plaza. Read more.

Exploratorium Picks:2013 Year in Science Stories From the “shmeaty” goodness of a test-tube hamburger to the glimmer of water on Mars, it’s been a year in science to remember—and in some cases (yep, we’re talking to you, comet ISON) to forget. Here are some of our picks for the year in science. We’ll share one of our top science stories each day of the first week of 2014. See them all at #2013SciencePicks.5. Water on MarsAfter celebrating its first anniversary on Mars, NASA’s car-sized Curiosity rover sent a gift back to Earth, discovering water in the Martian soil—along with other evidence that the Martian environment was once habitable.http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/main/

Exploratorium Picks:

2013 Year in Science Stories


From the “shmeaty” goodness of a test-tube hamburger to the glimmer of water on Mars, it’s been a year in science to remember—and in some cases (yep, we’re talking to you, comet ISON) to forget. Here are some of our picks for the year in science. We’ll share one of our top science stories each day of the first week of 2014. See them all at #2013SciencePicks.

5. Water on Mars

After celebrating its first anniversary on Mars, NASA’s car-sized Curiosity rover sent a gift back to Earth, discovering water in the Martian soil—along with other evidence that the Martian environment was once habitable.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/main/

While water in small amounts appears colorless, most large bodies of water appear blue due to the selective absorption and scattering of white light as well as the blue sky’s reflection. Lakes and oceans get their many hues—ranging from clear blue to muddy brown—in part from suspended sediment and microscopic living matter such as plankton. The 32 swatches in the Color of Water exhibit offer a clue to what elements might affect the color of the San Francisco Bay as it changes day to day or even moment to moment. What color is the bay today? Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

While water in small amounts appears colorless, most large bodies of water appear blue due to the selective absorption and scattering of white light as well as the blue sky’s reflection. Lakes and oceans get their many hues—ranging from clear blue to muddy brown—in part from suspended sediment and microscopic living matter such as plankton. The 32 swatches in the Color of Water exhibit offer a clue to what elements might affect the color of the San Francisco Bay as it changes day to day or even moment to moment. What color is the bay today?

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Confused Sea exhibitPhoto by Amy Snyder© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Confused Sea exhibit

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

New exhibit Sun Swarm, located outside Pier 15, helps show how light reflects off the Bay. #10daystilopeningPhoto by Amy Snyder© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

New exhibit Sun Swarm, located outside Pier 15, helps show how light reflects off the Bay. #10daystilopening

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

explodingtorium:

Waterworks preview party postcard shoot, 1979, photo by Susan Schwartzenberg

explodingtorium:

Waterworks preview party postcard shoot, 1979, photo by Susan Schwartzenberg

chicagohistorymuseum:

Men fishing from North Pier, sitting along a breakwater at the mouth of the Chicago River, 1915. Photograph by Chicago Daily News.
Want a copy of this photo?  > Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0061669


This is great

chicagohistorymuseum:

Men fishing from North Pier, sitting along a breakwater at the mouth of the Chicago River, 1915. Photograph by Chicago Daily News.

Want a copy of this photo?  
> Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0061669

This is great

Snowy Bits

Melting snow and ice on a car windshield at Lake Tahoe. #noticing
Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Snowy Bits

Melting snow and ice on a car windshield at Lake Tahoe. #noticing

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

nprfreshair:

ryandonato:



Kanoa Zimmerman




So beautiful.
And a good excuse to listen to Grizzly Bear perform “Deep Blue Sea.”
nprfreshair:

ryandonato:



Kanoa Zimmerman




So beautiful.
And a good excuse to listen to Grizzly Bear perform “Deep Blue Sea.”
nprfreshair:

ryandonato:



Kanoa Zimmerman




So beautiful.
And a good excuse to listen to Grizzly Bear perform “Deep Blue Sea.”
nprfreshair:

ryandonato:



Kanoa Zimmerman




So beautiful.
And a good excuse to listen to Grizzly Bear perform “Deep Blue Sea.”
explodingtorium:

Watch Water Freeze, An Exhibit by Charles Sowers
MORE INFO

explodingtorium:

Watch Water Freeze, An Exhibit by Charles Sowers

MORE INFO

Cool thing #38 that we won’t be taking with us to Pier 15: The Wave Organ. (It’ll be staying right where it has lived for the last 26 years!)
Photo by Amy Snyder© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Cool thing #38 that we won’t be taking with us to Pier 15: The Wave Organ. (It’ll be staying right where it has lived for the last 26 years!)

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Ice Balloon
Salt sprinkled on a ball of ice etches intricate channels in the frozen sphere.
Photo by Lily Rodriguez© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Ice Balloon

Salt sprinkled on a ball of ice etches intricate channels in the frozen sphere.

Photo by Lily Rodriguez
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Watch Water Freeze
Spiky ice crystals seen through polarized light shine with rainbow colors at the Exploratorium exhibit Watch Water Freeze.
Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Watch Water Freeze

Spiky ice crystals seen through polarized light shine with rainbow colors at the Exploratorium exhibit Watch Water Freeze.

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper