Can you tell what season it is, based on how the sunlight looks in your neighborhood at a particular time of day, or by what kinds of shadows familiar buildings cast? See this phenomena in a new way. Jump into our Observatory’s brand new Sky Theater to see the sun’s positioning change as it passes over San Francisco on the equinoxes and solstices of one year.  Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Can you tell what season it is, based on how the sunlight looks in your neighborhood at a particular time of day, or by what kinds of shadows familiar buildings cast? See this phenomena in a new way. Jump into our Observatory’s brand new Sky Theater to see the sun’s positioning change as it passes over San Francisco on the equinoxes and solstices of one year.

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu

Snowy Bits

Melting snow and ice on a car windshield at Lake Tahoe. #noticing
Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Snowy Bits

Melting snow and ice on a car windshield at Lake Tahoe. #noticing

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

nybg:

As we hoof it toward winter, we expect to be seeing more snowflakes in the Garden (barring another winter like last year, of course). What I didn’t expect to see was the extent to which these snowflakes resemble plants, be it a small shrub, the tip of a pine branch, or a spindly desert-dwelling tree. —MN

the-star-stuff:

Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes

Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile.

As we celebrate all that our community has accomplished over the past 43 years and all we have to look forward to in the years to come, we’re grateful for you—our extended Exploratorium family and friends. We couldn’t have grown the Exploratorium into what it is today without your dedication, commitment, and support. The new year promises to be an exciting one, and we’re thrilled to take this next step into our future at the piers with you.

From all of us at the Exploratorium, we offer our warmest wishes for a joyful holiday season and a very happy new year.

Sincerely,

Dennis M. Bartels, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Exploratorium

Watch Water Freeze
Spiky ice crystals seen through polarized light shine with rainbow colors at the Exploratorium exhibit Watch Water Freeze.
Photo by Amy Snyder © Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper

Watch Water Freeze

Spiky ice crystals seen through polarized light shine with rainbow colors at the Exploratorium exhibit Watch Water Freeze.

Photo by Amy Snyder
© Exploratorium, www.exploratorium.edu/downloads/wallpaper